Joy Harris


"Watercolor has a mind of it's own.  To be bold with it and yet have enough skill to control it is my challenge.  It is the most exciting medium I have found to express my pleasure in the ever changing moods of nature" ...Joy Harris

   Glorious Evening 18 X 24     This image is a small crop of the original work.  Please visit us to see the complete work and other pieces we are showing for Joy Harris.

Glorious Evening 18 X 24

This image is a small crop of the original work.  Please visit us to see the complete work and other pieces we are showing for Joy Harris.

Joy Harris became interested in watercolor painting in 1970 with participation in a workshop.  The workshop taken just for fun emphasized the creative approach to watercolor.  The excitement and challenge of personal expression through the medium of watercolor continues to provide genuine fulfillment for this artist.  Recently, she has combined the use of acrylics with watercolor, sometimes working transparently and other times working with more opaque techniques on canvas with collage.

Born in Dallas, she has lived in several areas of the state, including ten years in small towns of West Texas.  During this time she developed a love for the desert and the southwestern states, with many trips to New Mexico, Colorado, California, and Arizona.  This background and knowledge of her native state, along with travels throughout the southwestern states, have provided her with a rich source of inspiration for her paintings.

A love of color is characterized in the vibrancy of her paintings, which are done in a realistic style with a touch of impressionism.  Her subject matter is varied because of a preference not to be locked into painting one particular subject or one particular way of painting.  Continued study and experimentation have resulted in  wide acceptance of her work by collectors.  Her paintings have been accepted into many juried exhibitions.  She has won numerous awards from 'Honorable Mention' to 'Best of Show'.

A favorite quotation attributed to Auguste Renoir essentially states Joy's philosophy of painting.  "...For me a picture must be a pleasant thing, joyous and pretty.  Yes, pretty, there are too many unpleasant things in life for us to fabricate still more."